Keemun Black Tea From China – Caffeine Content, Health Benefits, And Other Properties

Keemun is a type of Chinese black tea, originating in Qimen county of Anhui Province, China. This article gives an overview of the caffeine content, health benefits, and other properties of Keemun.

Keemun is primarily produced in Anhui province, but teas in this style have also begun to be produced in nearby Hubei, as well as in Jiangxi, and even in Taiwan. Keemun is usually described as having an earthy aroma, and its overall character is quite different from Indian and Ceylon teas. My personal perspective is that Keemun has a richer, warmer quality, often reminiscent of dried fruit, and in higher grades, a pleasing hint of wood or wood smoke. These teas are rich and full-bodied, and are among my favorite black teas.

Caffeine content:

Although you may be looking for more concrete information, it is hard to generalize about the caffeine content of Keemun. Even though it originates primarily in one region and shares certain aspects of production, Keemun is fairly diverse, coming in different grades. As a general rule though, Keemun is often in the moderate to high end of caffeine content, among teas, which means that it still has considerably less caffeine than a typical cup of coffee. Keemun has historically been used in breakfast blends, where strongly caffeinated teas were desired

Health benefits:

Keemun has actually been the subject of direct scientific study., in association with weight loss in animal studies. There is only a small amount of research referring specifically to this variety of tea, however, so most of what can be said about Keemun must be inferred from general studies about black tea.

Although green tea has a stronger association with supposed “health benefits” in the public consciousness in the United States, this association may be skewed by historical factors. Much of the early research on tea and health was conducted in Japan, where tea is synonymous with green tea. Subsequent research has found substantial evidence that black tea is healthy as well. In the absence of more reserach specifically looking at Keemun, it seems reasonable to conclude that Keemun is likely to have a similar amonut of health benefits to black tea.

Locating high-quality Keemun:

My recommendation, if you want to buy the best Keemun, is to buy exclusively loose-leaf. My experience is that the best Keemun is usually sold by companies that specialize in Chinese tea. Because they store relatively well, Chinese black teas, even those of considerably high quality, tend to be relatively inexpensive, with all but the highest grades (Keemun Hao Ya A and B, and Keemun Mao Feng) costing well under $10 for about 1/4 pound or about 100-125 grams. A few companies, including Rishi Tea, Arbor Teas, and Little Red Cup, sell fair trade certified Keemun, produced in Hubei, Anhui, and Jiangxi provinces, respectively.

Little Known Facts on The Importance of Self Image

It is not a surprise to most people that health studies point to

popular culture as a perpetrator of body image which has

corresponded to the self image and well being of women AND men.

What may surprise you is that this is not a new phenomenon.

Is the rail thin appearance of runway and magazine models a new

obsession which has started young girls and women on a path

towards starvation, malnutrition and disorders such as anorexia

and bulimia?

Actually, No.

The western world created a popular culture of ‘you can never be

to thin’ as early as the 20’s when flapper styles caused women to

starve and over exercise their bodies to attain the flat chested,

androgynous look that was popular at that time.

The fuller figure did make a comeback during the depression, but

quickly reverted in the 60’s with thinness being equated with

physical beauty.

Studies on self image indicate that women tend to consider

themselves heavier than they really are. This distorted body

image is linked to unhealthy dietary practices like anorexia and

bulimia.

Although distorted body image affects men and women of all age

ranges, it is middle and upper class women who are most commonly

affected in thinking they are too heavy and need to loose weight.

Girls as young as nine are following the paths set down by

mothers, sisters and others.

On the other hand, men with body image problems often feel they

are too thin and use of steroids by youths trying to build muscle

mass shows that they are also adversely affected by media

portrayals of the body.

Bad self image is learned. This can be clearly illustrated by a

study conducted by WHO with Canadian students. The study showed

that the confidence of children dropped dramatically through the

pre-teen years. The percentage of 11 year old boys and girls who

felt confident all of the time was 47% and 35% respectively. By

age 15 the percentage dropped to 30% for boys and a disappointing

14% for girls.

What are we teaching our children?

In a quote from Health Canada based on a research program for

VITALITY the following report was made: “Slimness in western

cultures is associated not only with success and sophistication,

but with character virtues. Conversely, obesity is the opposite

of all these things and, particularly in the case of women, is

associated with failure and a collapse of self-discipline.”

Self image is tied to several factors, only one of which is body

image. Self image is part of self awareness and starts early in

childhood, even before speech. As we become adults many tie their

self image to such factors as job success, relationships and

abilities. Body image – if a person has a negative view of

themselves physically – can be one of the most dramatic

influences.

Health Canada’s findings show that although self image may be

subject to change throughout our life, our “fundamental sense of

feeling worthy or unworthy (self-esteem) remains relatively

stable”. This means that it is while children are still young

that the most impact is made on their future self image. Creating

a safe, nurturing and loving environment can be the greatest

protection against negative body image and low self-esteem.

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes

only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any

disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any

health care program.

Eating Disorders: The Good News About Helping Your Anorexic Child With the Maudsley Approach

There is a method by which parents take complete control over the food their children eat. True, it is controversial. But for the same reasons that most new methods are controversial; lack of education and true understanding. The method I am referring to is called the Maudsley Approach.

One of the terms most associated with eating disorders is “control.” The general belief is that if the girl or individual only had enough self-control they would be able to combat their “illness.” Then the entire ordeal would be resolved.

Many believe an eating disorder is about lack of personal control but it is not. With anorexia the parents need to take control which is a frightening prospect. It seems almost barbaric and many professionals are adamantly against it.

When parents realize they must do what they believe they haven’t been able to do already; which is get their child to eat, they feel worried and frustrated. They have thoughts like, “What if we do something wrong or what if heaven forbid we make it worse?!?” Or “If I could get my child to eat I would have done it already! And you’re telling me the answer is to get my kid to eat! That makes no sense!”

The Maudsley Approach is definitely not for everyone. For years parents have been told that if they do take control, that it will undoubtedly make things worse. Maudsley requires that you believe in your abilities as a parent at the very same time that you have lost that belief. Some parents cannot get beyond the belief there is nothing they can do.

This is what you need to know: You have not done anything wrong. An eating disorder is a powerful illness and it has in many ways taken over your lives. It has overwhelmed you and your family. The eating disorder or ED has convinced you that you cannot help your child.

You have begun to believe there is nothing you can do because you feel utterly helpless. You hear talk of in-patient facilities, and you wonder if this may be the best and only option.

The lie has become the reality, that ED is in control, and you fear there is absolutely nothing you can do to make your child eat. First your child began to believe this concept, and then ED convinced you too that he is in charge.

But there is good news here! The good news is you do have influence and more power than you know. The good news is you can learn a method that may indeed help your child not only eat, but eventually want to eat.

Don’t give up. Get to know the Maudsley Approach before you make any more decisions about treatment for your child.